osamah:

i like girls who look like they kill people for a living

image

(via theboyyoulove-d)

(Source: a-cidiq, via 87daysbefore)

there-was-no-other-sound:

rnultiplayer:

wanna know what a cow looks like washed and blow dried?

image

image

that is what a cow looks like washed and blow dried

FLUFFY MILK HORSE

(via mydrunkkitchen)

myoozick:

home // edward sharpe & the magnetic zeros

(via weepingdildo)

unexplained-events:

Have you guys heard about the new monument being built for Oklahoma’s Statehouse? The statue is a direct response to the state’s installation of a Ten Commandments monument outside the Capitol in 2012. 

How fucking metal

SOURCE

(via unexplained-events)

sixpenceee:

UNETHICAL EXPERIMENTS: SHOCKS FOR PICTURES
In 1862, French neurologist Guillaume Duchenne wanted to test the popular theory (at the time) that the face was directly linked to the soul.
He had already done some work applying electric shocks to patients’ damaged muscles and he reasoned that if he could apply electric currents to a subject’s face he could stimulate the muscles and photograph the results.
One problem was that while it was easy to activate responses with electric shocks, it passed too quickly for the camera to record. 
One of the patients at the hospital where Duchenne worked was a shoemaker who suffered from facial paralysis, which meant he would hold facial expressions longer- long enough to photograph. 
The above picture is one of the pictures. 

Duchenne subjected the shoemaker to over 100 sessions. While it was clearly unethical and pretty painful, Duchenne figured out the muscles required for a genuine smile.  
SOURCE

sixpenceee:

UNETHICAL EXPERIMENTS: SHOCKS FOR PICTURES

In 1862, French neurologist Guillaume Duchenne wanted to test the popular theory (at the time) that the face was directly linked to the soul.

He had already done some work applying electric shocks to patients’ damaged muscles and he reasoned that if he could apply electric currents to a subject’s face he could stimulate the muscles and photograph the results.

One problem was that while it was easy to activate responses with electric shocks, it passed too quickly for the camera to record.

One of the patients at the hospital where Duchenne worked was a shoemaker who suffered from facial paralysis, which meant he would hold facial expressions longer- long enough to photograph.

The above picture is one of the pictures.

Duchenne subjected the shoemaker to over 100 sessions. While it was clearly unethical and pretty painful, Duchenne figured out the muscles required for a genuine smile.  

SOURCE

"I was lying in my bed this morning and all of a sudden I got this really sharp pain right by my heart. I felt like I was getting stabbed in the heart. It lasted for about 15 seconds. My thoughts were racing and I was trying to breathe heavy to get it to go away and I thought I was going to die. This is the part where it applies to every single one of you. I’ve tried to take my life before, I’ve wanted to die so many times in my life, but when I felt like something was going to kill me without my control, all of those thoughts stopped. In my mind I was begging I would be okay. No matter how much you hate the world, no matter how much you hate yourself, there are answers that are better than death. Believe me. There are people that love you. I love you, for crying out loud. There are people who would be a wreck if you were gone. There is a reason we are all on this Earth, I promise you, even if you don’t see it now. If you’re feeling alone, know that the world can be a lonely place but it would be lonelier without you in it."

Hayley Williams (via hayleyfromparamore)

(via meow-69)

msannthropic:

death-limes:

venipede:

osteophagy:

endcetaceanexploitation:

Washoe was a chimp who was taught sign language.
One of Washoe’s caretakers was pregnant and missed work for many weeks after she miscarried. Roger Fouts recounts the following situation:
"People who should be there for her and aren’t are often given the cold shoulder—her way of informing them that she’s miffed at them. Washoe greeted Kat [the caretaker] in just this way when she finally returned to work with the chimps. Kat made her apologies to Washoe, then decided to tell her the truth, signing "MY BABY DIED." Washoe stared at her, then looked down. She finally peered into Kat’s eyes again and carefully signed "CRY", touching her cheek and drawing her finger down the path a tear would make on a human (Chimpanzees don’t shed tears). Kat later remarked that one sign told her more about Washoe and her mental capabilities than all her longer, grammatically perfect sentences." [23]
Washoe herself lost two children; one baby died shortly after birth of a heart defect, the other baby, Sequoyah, died of a staph infection at two months of age.

more about Washoe:
after the death of her children, researchers were determined to have Washoe raise a baby and brought in a ten month chimpanzee named Loulis. one of the caretakers went to Washoe’s enclosure and signed “i have a baby for you.” Washoe became incredibly excited, yelling and swaying from side to side, signing “baby” over and over again. then she signed “my baby.”
the caretaker came back with Loulis, and Washoe’s excitement disappeared entirely. she refused to pick Loulis up, instead signing “baby” apathetically; it was clear that the baby she thought she was getting was going to be Sequoyah. eventually Washoe did approach Loulis, and by the next day the two had bonded and from then on she was utterly devoted to him.
*information shamelessly paraphrased from When Elephants Weep by Jeffrey Masson.

Even more interestingly, after Washoe and Loulis bonded, she started teaching him American Sign Language the same way that human parents teach their children language. It only took Loulis eight days to learn his first sign from Washoe, and aside from the seven that his human handlers learned around him, he learned to speak in ASL just as fluently as Washoe and was able to communicate with humans in the same way she could.

now if y’all don’t think this is the tightest shit you can get outta my face

reblog for the commentary

msannthropic:

death-limes:

venipede:

osteophagy:

endcetaceanexploitation:

Washoe was a chimp who was taught sign language.

One of Washoe’s caretakers was pregnant and missed work for many weeks after she miscarried. Roger Fouts recounts the following situation:

"People who should be there for her and aren’t are often given the cold shoulder—her way of informing them that she’s miffed at them. Washoe greeted Kat [the caretaker] in just this way when she finally returned to work with the chimps. Kat made her apologies to Washoe, then decided to tell her the truth, signing "MY BABY DIED." Washoe stared at her, then looked down. She finally peered into Kat’s eyes again and carefully signed "CRY", touching her cheek and drawing her finger down the path a tear would make on a human (Chimpanzees don’t shed tears). Kat later remarked that one sign told her more about Washoe and her mental capabilities than all her longer, grammatically perfect sentences." [23]

Washoe herself lost two children; one baby died shortly after birth of a heart defect, the other baby, Sequoyah, died of a staph infection at two months of age.

more about Washoe:

after the death of her children, researchers were determined to have Washoe raise a baby and brought in a ten month chimpanzee named Loulis. one of the caretakers went to Washoe’s enclosure and signed “i have a baby for you.” Washoe became incredibly excited, yelling and swaying from side to side, signing “baby” over and over again. then she signed “my baby.”

the caretaker came back with Loulis, and Washoe’s excitement disappeared entirely. she refused to pick Loulis up, instead signing “baby” apathetically; it was clear that the baby she thought she was getting was going to be Sequoyah. eventually Washoe did approach Loulis, and by the next day the two had bonded and from then on she was utterly devoted to him.

*information shamelessly paraphrased from When Elephants Weep by Jeffrey Masson.

Even more interestingly, after Washoe and Loulis bonded, she started teaching him American Sign Language the same way that human parents teach their children language. It only took Loulis eight days to learn his first sign from Washoe, and aside from the seven that his human handlers learned around him, he learned to speak in ASL just as fluently as Washoe and was able to communicate with humans in the same way she could.

now if y’all don’t think this is the tightest shit you can get outta my face

reblog for the commentary

(via sixpenceee)

sharkeisha:

Katy Perry’s response after being asked to sign a picture of a Grammy Award (Katy doesn’t have any Grammy’s and it’s part of an ongoing joke other fan bases use against her)

this isn’t funny it’s just horrible

(Source: roopop, via weepingdildo)